Between the years of 2009 and 2012, pedestrian deaths throughout the country increased 15 percent.

While the interaction between automobiles in a crash can result in traumatic injuries, this is even truer when it is a pedestrian involved in a crash. These situations often result in serious injuries to the pedestrian and sometimes even death. Until recently the number of these outcomes was on the rise. A recent report indicates that though California is still home to many pedestrian fatalities, throughout the nation, things may have improved in 2013.

Between the years of 2009 and 2012, pedestrian deaths throughout the country increased 15 percent. This increase is particularly striking since motor vehicle deaths of other types declined at that same time. The increase in pedestrian deaths is thought to be due to a combination of factors such as more individuals walking to aid the environment and their health. In addition, during that period of time it is possible that more individuals were walking in an effort to save money.

The Governors Highway Safety Association determined that nationally, the first six months of 2013 were safer for pedestrians as compared to the same period of time the previous year. There are likely a variety of reasons for this reduction including enforcement of traffic laws, education and engineering. The latter reason includes the addition of things such as:

  • Pedestrian crossing signals
  • Median refuge islands
  • Midblock crossing

Though the final number of pedestrian deaths in 2013 has not yet been determined, the trend is encouraging. In the meantime families of pedestrians who are killed by drivers may decide to seek compensation for the untimely loss of a loved one. This could be accomplished via a wrongful death lawsuit.

Source: Governors Highway Safety Association, “Reversal in Three-Year Uptick in Pedestrian Fatalities,” March 5, 2014

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