When certain high-risk issues are identified, the report suggests that the issues be checked against inspection procedures.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is required to conduct causation studies into large truck crashes. The purposes of the study include understanding why large truck crashes occur so the FMCSA and other organizations can facilitate requirements to increase safety on the roads.

One of the issues identified by the report as leading to accidents is improper inspection and vehicle maintenance. According to the report, issues such as faulty brakes have been blamed for many trucking accidents in the past, despite the fact that the FMCSA spends millions on inspections for buses and trucks every year.

The report indicates that the FMCSA and other organizations should review specific data from these inspections in order to determine some root causes behind accidents due to by maintenance problems.The report suggests investigating the exact role that failed components such as breaks played in a truck accident. For example, was an accident the result solely of failed breaks, or did breaks fail because of improper driver operation?

When certain high-risk issues are identified, the report suggests that the issues be checked against inspection procedures. Are the high-risk components being property evaluated during inspection? Periodic evaluation of these high-risk parts could reduce the chance they malfunction on the roadway.

While additional safety measures are a positive step for all drivers on the road, they aren’t likely to reduce truck accidents to zero. Too many factors can be at play with moving vehicles and drivers, and vehicle maintenance is only one factor identified by this report. If you are injured in an accident caused by a truck driver or large truck, then you have options for seeking compensation to cover your losses.

Source: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, “Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) Analysis Series: Using LTCCS Data for Statistical Analyses of Crash Risk,” accessed Sep. 04, 2015

Tags:

Leave a Comment!

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.